THE COTUIT FEDERATED CHURCH

40 School Street, Cotuit, MA 02635
508- 428- 6163 | CFC436@comcast.net | Directions

Church History

On the evening of February 16, 1846, about 25 men of Cotuit Port, most of them sea captains, met to consider the possibility of building a spacious and conveniently located Meeting House at which Baptists, Congregationalists, and Methodists might worship together.

Before the evening was out, they adopted a statement of purpose, indicated the number of shares each would take at $25 a share, and decided to build on land owned by Captain Leander Nickerson at the top of the hill midway between Cotuit Port and the area known as Highground.

This arrangement worked so well that, early in the 1870s, the building was raised to add a lower floor to accommodate the growing Sunday School and to obtain more space for community gatherings. In 1879, however, there was a parting of the ways between the Congregationalists and the Methodists. The Methodists secured land at the corner of School and High Streets (the site of our present church) and on April 5, 1901 the cornerstone was laid.

A period of calm descended upon the community and social life seems to have resumed its former character and pace. But by the early 1920s, both denominations were apparently quite willing to consider the desirability of federation. The explanation most often given for this event was "to have a church at all, self-supporting and doing its work properly, cooperation must be practiced."

Whatever the reasons for federation, those who took that step in 1923 agreed to disagree, but resolved to love and serve. The Cotuit Federated Church continues its affiliation as a United Methodist and United Church of Christ (formerly Congregational) Church welcoming worshipers of all traditions.

 

The complete history of The Cotuit Federated Church can be obtained by calling or emailing the church.

"The Cotuit Federated Church Our Beginnings: 150 Years of Church Life in Cotuit" written by Edson and Priscilla Scudder for the Sesquicentennial Celebrations 1996